News & Views - November 2017

News & Views is Bishop Noa Home’s monthly resident/family newsletter.  Here, you will find an abridged version of the information contained in our current issue of News & Views.  Due to our dedication to our residents’ privacy, we do not include the entirety of our newsletter online.

Religious Services

The religious services schedule can be found under

Reminder for Use of the Sister Pat Room

The Sister Pat Room is our “multi-function” room.  It may be reserved by residents and family members for private gatherings in accordance with the following rules. 1. Any use of the Sister Pat Room needs to be coordinated through the Activities Department-date, time, etc. 2. Room cannot be reserved for Holidays. 3. Reserving party is responsible for set up and clean up of the room. 4. Reserving party is responsible for own party supplies and waiting or clearing their own tables. 5. No use of the Kitchenette is allowed. 6. Saturdays and Sundays, the room is set up for Mass.

Calendar of Events

This calendar of events is subject to change.  Activities are added, removed, and otherwise changed depending on a number of factors.

Employee of the Month

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Bishop Noa Home

Sisters of St. Paul de Chartres

(906) 786-5810

Special Days

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Who Are We? - Highlights from the History of the Sisters of St. Paul de Chartres

1699.  With the blessing and encouragement of the Bishop of Chartres, Fr. Chauvet gathered his four sisters together in a small house, close to the parish church, and drew up for them a simple rule of life.  He had no thought of founding a great international religious order.  He only wanted a few nuns to take care of the poor in his parish. As every human organization must have a head to insure order, Fr. Chauvet appointed the youngest of the Sisters, seventeen-year-old Marie Michau, as the first superior.  It is providential that the Sisters of St. Paul, who have been always young at heart, joyous and courageous with the joy and courage of youth, as simple and idealistic as a child, should have begun with a superior who was only seventeen. In October of 1699, Fr. Chauvet stood at the pulpit at Sunday Mass and proudly announced: “Tomorrow will see the opening of our free school for children.  Tomorrow the visiting of the sick and poor will start in our parish.”  The four smiling young women were called “School Sisters”.  So many children flocked to them that they could not fit in the tiny house.  So they went down to the basement floor, to the “cave” and there by candle light they taught reading, writing, arithmetic, and catechism. Upstairs, adolescent girls learned to sew and to cook, to change a house into a home, preparing to be wives and mothers for tomorrow. But the “School Sisters” were also nursing sisters, and social workers.  Their lives centered around the poor.  They went from cottage to cottage, finding the sick, caring for them, and praying with them. The sisters gave everything--education or social help--like St. Paul, free of charge.  They sold their own knitting and embroidery work to cover their daily expenses, and thanks to Divine Providence they had a surplus left over for the poor. They kept no records.  They left no statistics.  They only took care of the poor in their village, with great love.  They nursed the sick, taught the little children, and prepared the young girls for life. They never had a notion that their work would spread over the whole world.

Thank You!

Thank You to all of our wonderful Volunteers, who visit us each month, sharing their time and talents with our Residents.  Whether you share your musical talent, visit with, listen to, read to, or assist them with activities, you are an important piece to our program. A HUGE Thank You! to all the family, staff, friends, and volunteers who donated candy and/or helped out with our Annual Trick-Or-Treat Open House.  We couldn’t have done it without you!

Bishop Noa Home

Sisters of St. Paul de Chartres

(906) 786-5810

Special Days

Follow us on Facebook! 2900 3rd Avenue South Escanaba, Mi 49829 (906) 786-5810 Webmaster
Click Here For Admission Information Click Here For Admission Information Menu

News & Views - November 2017

News & Views is Bishop Noa Home’s monthly resident/family newsletter.  Here, you will find an abridged version of the information contained in our current issue of News & Views.  Due to our dedication to our residents’ privacy, we do not include the entirety of our newsletter online.

Religious Services

The religious services schedule can be found under

Reminder for Use of the Sister Pat

Room

The Sister Pat Room is our “multi-function” room.  It may be reserved by residents and family members for private gatherings in accordance with the following rules. 1. Any use of the Sister Pat Room needs to be coordinated through the Activities Department-date, time, etc. 2. Room cannot be reserved for Holidays. 3. Reserving party is responsible for set up and clean up of the room. 4. Reserving party is responsible for own party supplies and waiting or clearing their own tables. 5. No use of the Kitchenette is allowed. 6. Saturdays and Sundays, the room is set up for Mass.

Calendar of Events

This calendar of events is subject to change.  Activities are added, removed, and otherwise changed depending on a number of factors.

Employee of the Month

Click Here for Employee of the Month Click Here for Employee of the Month Click Here for Employee of the Month Click Here to View Calendar Click Here to View Calendar Click Here to View Calendar Pastoral Services Pastoral Services Pastoral Services
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 11th 21st 23rd
All Saints Day - Holy Day of Obligation All Souls Day First Friday First Saturday Veteran’s Day The Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary Thanksgiving Day

Who Are We? - Highlights from

the History of the Sisters of St.

Paul de Chartres

1699.  With the blessing and encouragement of the Bishop of Chartres, Fr. Chauvet gathered his four sisters together in a small house, close to the parish church, and drew up for them a simple rule of life.  He had no thought of founding a great international religious order.  He only wanted a few nuns to take care of the poor in his parish. As every human organization must have a head to insure order, Fr. Chauvet appointed the youngest of the Sisters, seventeen-year-old Marie Michau, as the first superior.  It is providential that the Sisters of St. Paul, who have been always young at heart, joyous and courageous with the joy and courage of youth, as simple and idealistic as a child, should have begun with a superior who was only seventeen. In October of 1699, Fr. Chauvet stood at the pulpit at Sunday Mass and proudly announced: “Tomorrow will see the opening of our free school for children.  Tomorrow the visiting of the sick and poor will start in our parish.”  The four smiling young women were called “School Sisters”.  So many children flocked to them that they could not fit in the tiny house.  So they went down to the basement floor, to the “cave” and there by candle light they taught reading, writing, arithmetic, and catechism. Upstairs, adolescent girls learned to sew and to cook, to change a house into a home, preparing to be wives and mothers for tomorrow. But the “School Sisters” were also nursing sisters, and social workers.  Their lives centered around the poor.  They went from cottage to cottage, finding the sick, caring for them, and praying with them. The sisters gave everything--education or social help--like St. Paul, free of charge.  They sold their own knitting and embroidery work to cover their daily expenses, and thanks to Divine Providence they had a surplus left over for the poor. They kept no records.  They left no statistics.  They only took care of the poor in their village, with great love.  They nursed the sick, taught the little children, and prepared the young girls for life. They never had a notion that their work would spread over the whole world.

Thank You!

Thank You to all of our wonderful Volunteers, who visit us each month, sharing their time and talents with our Residents.  Whether you share your musical talent, visit with, listen to, read to, or assist them with activities, you are an important piece to our program. A HUGE Thank You! to all the family, staff, friends, and volunteers who donated candy and/or helped out with our Annual Trick-Or-Treat Open House.  We couldn’t have done it without you!